Braid: A Movement Piece


The Chaparral High School Alumni Theatre’s production of Braid: A Movement Piece during the summer of 2010. Using a unique combination of content movement and contact improvisation dance techniques, Braid follows the story of young scientist Tim on his quest to find a Princess.

7 Responses to “Braid: A Movement Piece”

  1. Cody Drew Says:

    I’ve looked for ways to contact Number-None, the developers of Braid, but have been fruitless in my efforts.

    I just wanted to leave you guys some heartfelt praise.

    I’ve played and appreciated Braid wholeheartedly. What you men (and/or women) have done in producing such a thought provoking game is astonishing. I have nothing but the highest level of thanks and praise for you guys in making something so beautiful – and I mean this in terms of art and story as well as the technical side of things.

    I’m an aspiring video game developer, I’m currently at University studying Multimedia Game Development here in Australia. In my eyes, you guys are heroes. You’ve done to me what one day I strive to do for others – you’ve made more than just a game, and you’ve crafted it so intricately and purposefully.

    I can’t express to you in words how fulfilling it was playing Braid and reaching the conclusion to the story. You’ve done what big names for years have struggled to do with games like Modern Warfare and Crysis. So much money put into telling an overly complicated story (though none the less fun). But you guys have done it with grace. And more than just that. It feels like you’ve made a tribute to games and gamers alike, whether intended or not.

    You’ve shown me that there really is a ghost in the machine so to speak; you’ve given a heart to your creation.

    And all I wanted to say was, thank you.
    Just thank you.

  2. Paul Says:

    No personal thoughts from Mr. Blow?

  3. Pritchard Says:

    Tangential :D

  4. Walker Says:

    Wow, standing ovation and everything. I’m not sure I’ve ever seen a theater piece inspired by a game before. Parts of it were incredibly beautiful.

  5. Tortliena Says:

    It’s surprising. I’ve never heard that a game could be written into a theater piece. That’s show that the game is enough a sort of art. But I always disagree with that idea of atomic bomb, and I largely prefer finding that the princess is a kind of time, maybe because I prefer complicated theories of time to the “simple” atomic bomb.
    But I can’t do anything, almost people think that, and I won’t cry (or just a little ^^) for it.
    The piece seems to be composed of a lot of dance, isn’t it? After all, it’s logical.
    Finally, I would only say: Good work, mister the develloper! It looks like that a lot of people thinks a lot of goods of your game (including me).
    P.S: Sorry if I’ve made mistakes. Being french and only have around 3 or 4 years of english lessons don’t make the things easier x_x.

  6. panzi Says:

    OT: Just bought the humble indie bundle 2. Yay, Braid under Linux! :) Does it support a gamepad under Windows? I mapped my gamepad using qjoypad, but things like rumble is not supported that way. Also the puzzles are much to hard for me (getting the puzzle peaces, not putting them together). I’m such a looser when it comes to these things. :(
    Same for
    Samorost 2: I can’t play it without using a walkthrough. I still try to get Machinarium to work under Linux (produces nothing but segmentation faults right now), but I guess this might be even harder and so I can forget playing it altogether.

  7. Kev Says:

    Love the game! But I’m really stuck on how to get 2 puzzle pieces! It’s driving me insane!

Leave a Reply